Aisle Be Damned : Novel Review

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The author of the book Aisle Be Damned, Rishi Piparaiya is an over-worked and over-traveled corporate executive based in the skies, 38,000 feet over India.
Not only was the cover-page intriguing but also compelling to read. Added to that, the bio of the author and I didn’t need anymore encouragement. I was waiting for this book for a long time and I am glad that it didn’t disappoint me at all.

source : flipkart.com

source : flipkart.com

Review:

Categorizing this book is difficult. As the author himself says, it is neither fiction nor non-fiction; it is neither horror (though he scares you a bit) nor action/adventure; it is neither humor (though is full of it) nor a travel-book; it is nothing in particular but so many things in general.
Although, I would call it a non-fictional humorous guidebook. It tells you everything about air-travel. Everything.

First things first, he gives you a list of things to carry while travelling and also their varied uses. And the moment you read this, you know that this book is unlike the rest and that you have embarked on a roller-coaster ride of laughter and fun.

Technically, this book is a manual or a guidebook for air-travellers, irrespective of whether they are first-time flyers or frequent flyers.
Rishi, in his impeccably humorous style and learnings learnt from incessant travelling, gives you a first-hand guidance of air-travel right from the moment you decide to travel to the moment you reach your destination.
Through Aisle Be Damned, he shares tidbits on ticket booking, seat selection, check-in, chance to get upgraded, checking out the people at the lounges and waiting areas of the airport, FIFO-LIFO system, occupying your seat, food, handrest tussles with co-passengers, using lavotories, ice-breakers for conversations, pilots and air-hostesses, mid-travel safety and how you can contribute to it, business class-economy class travel, using water bottle for being safe, getting out early, luggage collecting, dealing with immigration and customs, pick-up people and you picking up people from airports, cabs fleecing customers and basic research and finally reaching your destination safely.
Yeah, that’s about everything related to air-travel.

Every topic is dealt with in separate chapters and they have been segregated really well. Every chapter starts with an anecdote that is either funny or profound and often, both.
‘It can hardly be a coincidence that no language on earth has ever produced the expression, ‘as pretty as an airport.’ – Douglas Adams.

The writing style is easy-to-read and hilarious. There is humor emanating out of every other word of the book. That also says about the amount of time he has spent travelling and also his observation skills.
As he says, your travelling experience will never be the same anymore. After reading the book, you will know much more about air-travel, even if you have never even set your foot at an airport.

At the end, Rishi gives us his personal opinions on capitalism, economics, peace, technology, losses for air-carriers, business ideas and life in general. Each and every opinion is again filled with humor yet they are intelligent. As he himself says, he deserves the Nobel for Peace and also Economics.
I don’t know about the Nobel, but he sure does deserve an award for the humor and the laughter that he provides to the readers.

I personally feel that everyone – who has already travelled, who is to travel and who wants to travel in aeroplanes must and should read this book.

Currently, Rishi is in talks with officials to include this book along with the magazines and newspapers in flights. If you want to vote for it, you can do it here.

I found this comment for the book really funny. (And I couldn’t agree more.)
“I read this manual, this veritable almanac, from start to finish in one go. Rishi’s writing is as fluid as his surname is complex.”
– Cyrus Broacha

Connect with the author here : Rishi Piparaiya
Book sent by Jaico Books.

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